Consider conducting informational interviews.

A great tool for both researching and networking is the informational interview, which as its name implies, is an interview with someone in your career field who can offer you insights and advice. This tool is especially useful for new college grads and career-changers, but can work for any job-seeker who wants to learn more Read More…

Don’t do it alone.

Job-hunting is also a lonely enterprise, and if you’re unemployed and living alone, the search can seem frustrating and endless. Instead, try to keep in touch with people in your circle who are also job-hunting — or consider joining a job club. Besides the camaraderie, sharing job-hunting ideas and strategies with others can help you Read More…

Develop anecdotes and stories that showcase your skills.

People remember stories over bullet points, so your goal should be developing a set of anecdotes you can use in networking and interviewing situations that clearly demonstrate your skills, accomplishments, and passion for your work. Using stories may also help you feel more comfortable talking about yourself. See our Career Storytelling Tools for Job-Seekers.

Prepare for all job interviews.

Before you get called for your first interview, develop responses for common interview questions, and then practice them — ideally using the mock-interviewing technique with a friend, network contact, or career counselor. The more prepared you are for the interview, the more comfortable you’ll be — and the more likely you’ll succeed. You’ll find many Read More…

Excel in the job interview.

Research the employer and interviewers, know your route for getting to the interview, dress appropriately, arrive about 10 minutes early (to compose yourself, observe your settings, complete any paperwork), greet everyone warmly (from receptionist to hiring manager), use positive body language (firm handshake, strong eye contact, attentive posture, and friendly smile), confidently respond to interview Read More…

Continue following up with hiring managers.

Your work is not done once the interview is complete or the thank-you note sent. Following up with the hiring manager regularly shows your interest and enthusiasm for the job. The key is doing so in a way that is professional while not making you sound pesky or needy. Read our article, The Art of Read More…